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Including source code in papers and on the web

March 20, 2015  |  web, publ, tools, python, programming

I've written many papers and a lot of web pages that includes source code. Since Python code was an important part of my Dr. thesis, I even wrote a tool to generate a pretty-printed Python code for LaTeX (this was written in 1997, but since I've been using it ever since it has had a few minor bug fixes since then; however, it needs Python 1.6 and it was the first Python program I ever wrote!). Just by accident (being sidetracked when I was checking out Middleman extensions) I rediscovered Pygments yesterday. I know I've seen it before, but I had forgotten all about it. This time I checked it out, and I think it will finally replace my home-written tool. Since I write most of my papers in LaTeX and I use BSDmake to do the magic, I have included a few new rules in my Makefile (using my old ltk.mk file):

PY2TEX =	pygmentize -f latex -P "verboptions=frame=single" -O linenos
SRCSTYLE =	srcstyle.sty
STYLETYPE =	default
MKSTYLE =	$(PY2TEX) -S $(STYLETYPE)

.include	"$(HOME)/lib/mk/ltx.mk"

$(LTXSRC):	$(SRCSTYLE)

$(SRCSTYLE):
		$(MKSTYLE) > $(.TARGET)

In the LaTeX document I have to include the generated style file and the fancyvrb package (and for most styles the color package). If the source code included in the document is in the file src/mypycode.py, then you will find this in the LaTeX document (ltx.mk expects to find source code files in the src directory):

\usepackage{fancyvrb}
\usepackage{color}
\usepackage{srcstyle}
...
\begin{figure}
  \begin{minipage}{0.9\linewidth}
    \input{src/mypycode.tex}
  \end{minipage}
  \caption{The caption text describing mypycode.}
\end{figure}

Pygments can be used to generate TeX, LaTeX, HTML and many other formats. It supports a wide range of programming languages, and can easily be extended to other formats and other programming languages. It is highly configurable and flexible, and the command line way of using it is the simple approach. For full control and flexibility you write your own tool using Pygments as a Python library (and it supports both Python 2 and 3).

The styles, programming languages, formats, and filters available can easily be listed with these commands:

pygmentize -L styles		# styles
pygmentize -L lexers		# programming languages
pygmentize -L formatters	# formats
pygmentize -L filters		# filters
pygmentize -L			# all
Last updated: March 20, 2015